Press

Award//Article//Runway

RUNWAY //

Portland Fashion Week
October F|W 2013
Portland, Oregon

Mercedes Benz Fashion Week
February F|W 2014
Manhattan, New York

FashioNXT
October F|W 2015
Portland, Oregon

New York Fashion Week
February F|W 2016
Manhattan, New York

Perspectives Fashion Instillation
June F|W 2016
Portland, Oregon

 

AWARD //

Ania Bridal Scholarship Winner
Won A Competition To Showcase at MBFW in New York 2014
Won A Competition Showcase at NYFW in New York 2015
FashioNXT Emerging Designer Winner
 

 

Video//

 

Chosen to be the subject of a documentary for new york fashion week

 

 

 

 

 

 

commercial for art institute 

 

 

 

 

 

Talking to Cliodna Egan director of research & development (Macy's) 

 

 

 

 

Video for Mercedes benz fashion week 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Magazine//

Portland Monthly Two Page Spread

http://www.pdxmonthly.com/articles/2015/12/21/german-madrigal-s-modern-style   A strange but potent mix of influences catapulted 27-year-old German Madrigal from serving grande lattes to winning the coveted Emerging Designer prize during this year’s local design showcase, FashioNXT. At the October show, the Salem native impressed both the judges and the crowd with a futuristic, gender-neutral collection full of sleek tailoring and vibrant pops of cobalt blue against stark black and white fabrics. The win capped two busy years for the Art Institute of Portland student. Madrigal won a local design contest for repurposing an old bedazzled wedding gown into a chic, modern look; he showed at Portland Fashion Week; and last February the Art Institute plucked him from among 40 students nationwide to debut a collection at the school’s New York Fashion Week showcase. (He’ll be back again this February.) Those endeavors come after the full-time job as a barista, part-time retail work, and, of course, his studies—but he’s used to working double-time.  Madrigal was born with just one kidney. He spent his early years in and out of hospitals, until his mother donated one of her own kidneys to him when he was 7. Every day, he still swallows a handful of anti-rejection pills—and a stark reminder of mortality. After finishing high school, he was on a predawn shift in a Starbucks drive-thru when fashion came calling.  “I had an epiphany in the middle of serving coffee,” he recalls. “I realized I didn’t want to just serve people who were on their way to their big jobs. If I only have so much time to live, I’m going to live the life that I want to. That idea is what pushed me to go to design school.” A month later he was in orientation. Once accepted as a finalist for FashioNXT, he hunkered down to produce his “Equilibrium” collection, watching the Beyoncé documentary Life Is But a Dream on repeat for inspiration—and a reminder to be fierce—while he sewed the bold, minimalist line.  “Not everyone has the same aesthetic,” he says. “There are people lurking in corners you wouldn’t expect, and people with different visions. I wanted to share my voice, and come out with a roar.” This article appeared in the January 2016 issue of Portland Monthly.

http://www.pdxmonthly.com/articles/2015/12/21/german-madrigal-s-modern-style

 

A strange but potent mix of influences catapulted 27-year-old German Madrigal from serving grande lattes to winning the coveted Emerging Designer prize during this year’s local design showcase, FashioNXT. At the October show, the Salem native impressed both the judges and the crowd with a futuristic, gender-neutral collection full of sleek tailoring and vibrant pops of cobalt blue against stark black and white fabrics.

The win capped two busy years for the Art Institute of Portland student. Madrigal won a local design contest for repurposing an old bedazzled wedding gown into a chic, modern look; he showed at Portland Fashion Week; and last February the Art Institute plucked him from among 40 students nationwide to debut a collection at the school’s New York Fashion Week showcase. (He’ll be back again this February.) Those endeavors come after the full-time job as a barista, part-time retail work, and, of course, his studies—but he’s used to working double-time. 

Madrigal was born with just one kidney. He spent his early years in and out of hospitals, until his mother donated one of her own kidneys to him when he was 7. Every day, he still swallows a handful of anti-rejection pills—and a stark reminder of mortality. After finishing high school, he was on a predawn shift in a Starbucks drive-thru when fashion came calling. 

“I had an epiphany in the middle of serving coffee,” he recalls. “I realized I didn’t want to just serve people who were on their way to their big jobs. If I only have so much time to live, I’m going to live the life that I want to. That idea is what pushed me to go to design school.”

A month later he was in orientation. Once accepted as a finalist for FashioNXT, he hunkered down to produce his “Equilibrium” collection, watching the Beyoncé documentary Life Is But a Dream on repeat for inspiration—and a reminder to be fierce—while he sewed the bold, minimalist line. 

“Not everyone has the same aesthetic,” he says. “There are people lurking in corners you wouldn’t expect, and people with different visions. I wanted to share my voice, and come out with a roar.”

This article appeared in the January 2016 issue of Portland Monthly.

 

 

 

blog//

 

NYMAG.com/The Cut

http://nymag.com/thecut/2016/02/200-designers-on-their-fall-2016-inspirations/slideshow/140/

http://nymag.com/thecut/2016/02/200-designers-on-their-fall-2016-inspirations/slideshow/140/


wwd.com (Women's Wear Daily)

wwd.com (Women's Wear Daily)


Mode

http://www.mode.com/fashion-style/roundups/the-art-institutes-german-madrigal/01241759?story=12054132%2Ffall-2016-preview-designers-sketches-inspirations

http://www.mode.com/fashion-style/roundups/the-art-institutes-german-madrigal/01241759?story=12054132%2Ffall-2016-preview-designers-sketches-inspirations


The Oregonian 

http://www.oregonlive.com/window-shop/index.ssf/2016/02/german_madrigal_nyfw.html   After winning a Portland fashion design competition in October, German Madrigal is showing his futuristic line at New York Fashion Week this Tuesday.  The 27-year-old from Vancouver will show the line as part of The Art Institutes Fall 2016 Runway Show, and will be one of 13 Art Institutes students or grads sending their designs down the runway. While Madrigal has shown at the prestigious New York Fashion Show once before, this will be his first time without a co-designer, and the exposure could give him a big boost in the fashion world. Madrigal's trip to New York Fashion Week comes on the heels of his win at FashioNXT, a Portland fashion show and competition. He wooed the judges with his stark gender-neutral designs, and he'll build on this line for his New York show.  We got a chance to chat with Madrigal before he heads to Manhattan, and he told us where he got his inspiration for the line, and gave us a few hints about his next collection. Answers have been edited for clarity and brevity.  Q: Tell me a little bit about your background. Where did you grow up, and how did you get into fashion?   See the show German Madrigal, along with 12 other designers from Art Institutes throughout the country, will be showing their lines at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 16, at Skylight at Moynihan Station, located at 360 West 33rd Streetin Manhattan. A: Nothing out of the norm. My family migrated from Mexico. We moved to Vancouver and have lived here ever since.  I always remember gravitating toward the arts, anything I could get my hands on. My mom always had to clean up the piles of products I had everywhere, so she could vouch for this. I would love dressing up my sister's Barbies. You could see the gleam in my eye every time my sister got a new Barbie.  Then, in high school – they make you do all those career assessments tests – and they would always tell me to go into the arts or fashion design. Then I took the ASVAB, that super accurate career test, and fashion design was my number one career.  That kind of just gave me a spark. When I got my drivers license, I called my parents. I said, "We're going to dinner, and I'm driving." They were suspicious. Next thing you know I end up kidnapping my parents and sending them to an Art Institute [of Portland] orientation meeting to see if I could go. My mom said, this is not a restaurant.  I visited the campus by myself, and then I had those typical conversations about choosing a school. Except I was super dramatic. I just wanted their blessing. I was like, I will die if I don't go here, I know what I want to do in life, I don't want to work at McDonalds.  So I started in 2008 and I've been taking classes ever since. I've worked full time the whole time. At first I babysat, then I worked at a Chinese restaurant. That didn't last long. I'm a barista at Starbucks now.  Q: What was the first time you designed something you were proud of?   This is the dress Madrigal designed for his friend. Courtesy German Madrigal  A: I had never touched a sewing machine in my life, never patterned anything, never been to a fabric store. I was starting from zero.  This was the one thing that made me realize that this is really hard but really fun: I first made a hot-pink corset dress for my friend who does drag. Somehow I made it happen, I remember thinking, I've never had so much fun.  As the years passed, I focused on my aesthetic. I really like modern, edgy, slick designs. I started from the beginning, with bright colors, but now I've evolved. Q: Will you show the same line from FashioNXT? A: Yes, but I added additional pieces because it's my senior thesis. I've added some styles and some custom handbags that I made myself. They're not your typical handbags.  Q: The line is very futuristic and gender-neutral. Tell me about your inspiration.   The Inversion: Plus Minus sculpture, created by artists Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo, sits at the Eastern base of the Hawthorne Bridge. Joe Rose/The Oregonian  A: It was honestly – you know that Inversion: Plus Minus sculpture near Belmont? After I came back from New York, I would get a drink at Dig A Pony and look at that sculpture, and that was my inspiration. That and constantly looking in stores' men's departments, and then looking at the women's departments, where there's such a wide variety.  My female friends would always say they wanted something different. Something that wasn't too feminine but still classy. That sculpture was made of so many parts but together they form this great shape. I love fall, and I love all the layers. I decided to make pieces that look like layers but you're really just wearing one. Pieces for both genders have equal attention to detail. Q: How do you design clothes to flatter both men's and women's bodies? A: Well, the jumpsuit is unisex, and so is the overcoat. I play with the silhouette and give room in certain areas. I give it a boxy fit. So it has a little more flow but still has that tailored look.  Q: Why do you shroud your models' faces? A: The number one reason? Every fashion show I've ever been, I've never been given freedom to do hair and makeup how I want to do it. And at FashioNXT it was a contest. So I custom-made these overthrow masks and handpainted them with India dye. I thought it worked better – it's not about the model, it's about the clothes, about how the garment is moving. And I was trying to mask the gender a little bit. Q: Can you tell us about your plans for your next line? Will it build on this one, aesthetically, or be a big departure? A: I'm thinking about doing another collection with my friend Ryan Edmonds. (Madrigal worked with Edmonds for his first NYFW show). We still work together as a team.  I'm doing a third collection with him, debuting at FashioNXT this fall. I've decided to do a high-end avant-garde collection with actual dresses. I want to do something experimental – keep the tailoring in there but do something unexpected for me.  I'm looking at a combination of Rick Owens, Yohji Yamamoto and Celine. Still feminine but there's still something twisted about it. I want to play with making my own textiles. We're still talking about it. It's going to be interesting. This might be my last collection for a while. Q: What's next for you? A: I need to focus on getting a job after I graduate in June. I really want to move to New York or California. I love Portland, but there's only so much here [for fashion designers], unfortunately.  I want to keep growing and learning. I'm willing to do pretty much whatever it takes to make this career happen. You can bet that after nine years in school I'm coming out running.  -- Anna Marum

http://www.oregonlive.com/window-shop/index.ssf/2016/02/german_madrigal_nyfw.html

 

After winning a Portland fashion design competition in October, German Madrigal is showing his futuristic line at New York Fashion Week this Tuesday. 

The 27-year-old from Vancouver will show the line as part of The Art Institutes Fall 2016 Runway Show, and will be one of 13 Art Institutes students or grads sending their designs down the runway.

While Madrigal has shown at the prestigious New York Fashion Show once before, this will be his first time without a co-designer, and the exposure could give him a big boost in the fashion world.

Madrigal's trip to New York Fashion Week comes on the heels of his win at FashioNXT, a Portland fashion show and competition. He wooed the judges with his stark gender-neutral designs, and he'll build on this line for his New York show. 

We got a chance to chat with Madrigal before he heads to Manhattan, and he told us where he got his inspiration for the line, and gave us a few hints about his next collection. Answers have been edited for clarity and brevity. 

Q: Tell me a little bit about your background. Where did you grow up, and how did you get into fashion?

 

See the show

German Madrigal, along with 12 other designers from Art Institutes throughout the country, will be showing their lines at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 16, at Skylight at Moynihan Station, located at 360 West 33rd Streetin Manhattan.

A: Nothing out of the norm. My family migrated from Mexico. We moved to Vancouver and have lived here ever since. 

I always remember gravitating toward the arts, anything I could get my hands on. My mom always had to clean up the piles of products I had everywhere, so she could vouch for this. I would love dressing up my sister's Barbies. You could see the gleam in my eye every time my sister got a new Barbie. 

Then, in high school – they make you do all those career assessments tests – and they would always tell me to go into the arts or fashion design. Then I took the ASVAB, that super accurate career test, and fashion design was my number one career. 

That kind of just gave me a spark. When I got my drivers license, I called my parents. I said, "We're going to dinner, and I'm driving." They were suspicious. Next thing you know I end up kidnapping my parents and sending them to an Art Institute [of Portland] orientation meeting to see if I could go. My mom said, this is not a restaurant. 

I visited the campus by myself, and then I had those typical conversations about choosing a school. Except I was super dramatic. I just wanted their blessing. I was like, I will die if I don't go here, I know what I want to do in life, I don't want to work at McDonalds. 

So I started in 2008 and I've been taking classes ever since. I've worked full time the whole time. At first I babysat, then I worked at a Chinese restaurant. That didn't last long. I'm a barista at Starbucks now. 

Q: What was the first time you designed something you were proud of?

 

This is the dress Madrigal designed for his friend. Courtesy German Madrigal 

A: I had never touched a sewing machine in my life, never patterned anything, never been to a fabric store. I was starting from zero. 

This was the one thing that made me realize that this is really hard but really fun: I first made a hot-pink corset dress for my friend who does drag. Somehow I made it happen, I remember thinking, I've never had so much fun. 

As the years passed, I focused on my aesthetic. I really like modern, edgy, slick designs. I started from the beginning, with bright colors, but now I've evolved.

Q: Will you show the same line from FashioNXT?

A: Yes, but I added additional pieces because it's my senior thesis. I've added some styles and some custom handbags that I made myself. They're not your typical handbags. 

Q: The line is very futuristic and gender-neutral. Tell me about your inspiration.

 

The Inversion: Plus Minus sculpture, created by artists Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo, sits at the Eastern base of the Hawthorne Bridge. Joe Rose/The Oregonian 

A: It was honestly – you know that Inversion: Plus Minus sculpture near Belmont? After I came back from New York, I would get a drink at Dig A Pony and look at that sculpture, and that was my inspiration. That and constantly looking in stores' men's departments, and then looking at the women's departments, where there's such a wide variety. 

My female friends would always say they wanted something different. Something that wasn't too feminine but still classy.

That sculpture was made of so many parts but together they form this great shape. I love fall, and I love all the layers. I decided to make pieces that look like layers but you're really just wearing one. Pieces for both genders have equal attention to detail.

Q: How do you design clothes to flatter both men's and women's bodies?

A: Well, the jumpsuit is unisex, and so is the overcoat. I play with the silhouette and give room in certain areas. I give it a boxy fit. So it has a little more flow but still has that tailored look. 

Q: Why do you shroud your models' faces?

A: The number one reason? Every fashion show I've ever been, I've never been given freedom to do hair and makeup how I want to do it. And at FashioNXT it was a contest. So I custom-made these overthrow masks and handpainted them with India dye. I thought it worked better – it's not about the model, it's about the clothes, about how the garment is moving. And I was trying to mask the gender a little bit.

Q: Can you tell us about your plans for your next line? Will it build on this one, aesthetically, or be a big departure?

A: I'm thinking about doing another collection with my friend Ryan Edmonds. (Madrigal worked with Edmonds for his first NYFW show). We still work together as a team. 

I'm doing a third collection with him, debuting at FashioNXT this fall. I've decided to do a high-end avant-garde collection with actual dresses. I want to do something experimental – keep the tailoring in there but do something unexpected for me. 

I'm looking at a combination of Rick Owens, Yohji Yamamoto and Celine. Still feminine but there's still something twisted about it. I want to play with making my own textiles. We're still talking about it. It's going to be interesting. This might be my last collection for a while.

Q: What's next for you?

A: I need to focus on getting a job after I graduate in June. I really want to move to New York or California. I love Portland, but there's only so much here [for fashion designers], unfortunately. 

I want to keep growing and learning. I'm willing to do pretty much whatever it takes to make this career happen. You can bet that after nine years in school I'm coming out running. 

-- Anna Marum


Perspectives of a portlander 

http://www.perspectivesofaportlander.com/blog/2015/9/30/fashionxt-interview-german-madrigal-equilibrium As a content contributor for FashioNXT, Portland's premiere fashion show, I've had the opportunity to help their social media team document the preparation process since late this summer. With the shows just around the corner (Oct. 7-10, see you there!) I thought it was time to hear what a designer had to say about their experience so far.  German Madrigal is a young Portland designer with quite the resume. Since beginning his design education in the heart of downtown Portland he began a partnership with local designer and friend, Ryan Edmonds on a collaboration of designs that has been very well received. The garments were seen by eyes everywhere, including the runway of Mercedes Benz Fashion Week. Now German is going it alone; debuting his first solo collection on the runway of FashioNxt. He has been documenting the process through teaser photos on his instagram page (@german.madrigal) and I couldn't wait to have a full view of the designs. I had the opportunity to speak with German about his inspirations and hopes for his first solo collection--Equilibrium. Q: What was the inspiration behind Equilibrium? A: The first inspiration came from this wall I drove passed one day while I was downtown; it was a multi-colored mural made up of all of these cooler blues and purples, "feminine" tones. It worked so well against the more "masculine" structure of the wall, and was the basis for this collection: structured asymmetrical pieces that work well for the masculine and feminine. Q: What has this process been like for you? How does FashioNxt differ from other shows you've done? A: The process has definitely been different, I'm on my own this time so it's a different experience not having someone there to bounce idea off of, but it's also amazing to see what you're capable of on your own. I'm so happy to be debuting this collection at FashioNxt, it's home. Q: What are your thoughts going into this and what are your hopes coming out of it? A: Well, my initial thoughts and hopes is that others will like the designs. Doing a completely unisex line is a little different, but deep down I think it's something that's needed for fashion. I can't tell you how many times I wander over to the women's section when shopping for clothes--This is a women's jumpsuit that I'm wearing right now. My hope longterm is that by seeing more designs that are wearable and can truly work for both sexes, people won't be afraid to branch out and really get what they want out of their clothing.

http://www.perspectivesofaportlander.com/blog/2015/9/30/fashionxt-interview-german-madrigal-equilibrium

As a content contributor for FashioNXT, Portland's premiere fashion show, I've had the opportunity to help their social media team document the preparation process since late this summer. With the shows just around the corner (Oct. 7-10, see you there!) I thought it was time to hear what a designer had to say about their experience so far. 

German Madrigal is a young Portland designer with quite the resume. Since beginning his design education in the heart of downtown Portland he began a partnership with local designer and friend, Ryan Edmonds on a collaboration of designs that has been very well received. The garments were seen by eyes everywhere, including the runway of Mercedes Benz Fashion Week. Now German is going it alone; debuting his first solo collection on the runway of FashioNxt. He has been documenting the process through teaser photos on his instagram page (@german.madrigal) and I couldn't wait to have a full view of the designs. I had the opportunity to speak with German about his inspirations and hopes for his first solo collection--Equilibrium.

Q: What was the inspiration behind Equilibrium?
A:
 The first inspiration came from this wall I drove passed one day while I was downtown; it was a multi-colored mural made up of all of these cooler blues and purples, "feminine" tones. It worked so well against the more "masculine" structure of the wall, and was the basis for this collection: structured asymmetrical pieces that work well for the masculine and feminine.

Q: What has this process been like for you? How does FashioNxt differ from other shows you've done?
A: The process has definitely been different, I'm on my own this time so it's a different experience not having someone there to bounce idea off of, but it's also amazing to see what you're capable of on your own. I'm so happy to be debuting this collection at FashioNxt, it's home.

Q: What are your thoughts going into this and what are your hopes coming out of it?
A: Well, my initial thoughts and hopes is that others will like the designs. Doing a completely unisex line is a little different, but deep down I think it's something that's needed for fashion. I can't tell you how many times I wander over to the women's section when shopping for clothes--This is a women's jumpsuit that I'm wearing right now. My hope longterm is that by seeing more designs that are wearable and can truly work for both sexes, people won't be afraid to branch out and really get what they want out of their clothing.